Focus

MODERN ART AND PREHISTORY
IMPRESSIONS AND EMOTIONS

An exhibition organised in 2018 at the Gare d’Austerlitz in Paris by the French National Museum of Natural History. « À la découverte de la paléontologie, du plus petit des microfossiles au plus grand des dinosaures » (Discovering palaeontology. From the tiniest microfossils to the largest dinosaurs).  Photo copyright: Sophie Cattoire
An exhibition organised in 2018 at the Gare d’Austerlitz in Paris by the French National Museum of Natural History. « À la découverte de la paléontologie, du plus petit des microfossiles au plus grand des dinosaures » (Discovering palaeontology. From the tiniest microfossils to the largest dinosaurs). Photo copyright: Sophie Cattoire

When Prehistory burst onto the scene in the middle of the 19ᵗʰ century there was a huge collective shock. No, the world had not been created in seven days; it was obviously too short a time. From that day on, Prehistory began to have a profound and confusing impact on modern man. Modern art has sometimes “translated” this shock, since artists express things they are obsessed by instead of bottling up their emotions. That is the road of research that Rémi Labrousse, modern art historian, embarked on. Last autumn he invited us to share the fruits of his research during a lecture he gave at the Pôle d'Interprétation de la Préhistoire in Les Eyzies: a follow-up to the group exhibition entitled “Préhistoire, une Énigme Moderne” held last summer at the Centre Pompidou in Paris. According to him, modern art, deeply affected by prehistoric art, reveals a sensitivity to this rich past, unlike History, reversing any linear vision of progress and imposing the idea of a loop, and therefore infinity. You can’t put a date to art. It just IS.

TARDIGLOBE – official clip

Online science news periodical
A global repository on the origins of life on Earth and the origins of mankind.

An exhibition organised in 2018 at the Gare d’Austerlitz in Paris by the French National Museum of Natural History. « À la découverte de la paléontologie, du plus petit des microfossiles au plus grand des dinosaures » (Discovering palaeontology. From the tiniest microfossils to the largest dinosaurs). Photo copyright: Sophie Cattoire

In addition to the news magazine www.albuga.info, we are busy preparing the TARDIGLOBE, an online science news periodical.

Here we are in the 21st century and the Flat Earth theories are back again! Time to lay down the foundations of natural science once more. No, the Earth is not flat. Yes, all forms of life are interconnected and things are forever changing. Yes, galloping technological advances and highly effective investigation methods afford more and more insight into the evolution of species in their multiple forms.

The TARDIGLOBE will liaise with us all, “citizens of the world”, informing us of the admirable and audacious work carried out by the scientific community: new and vital discoveries – a shield against barbarity that lurks in the shadows.

Sophie Cattoire

Annonces